Click to call 602-254-8880 24/7 Click Here for Free Consultation

Archive for June, 2019

Filing for Bankruptcy Before, During or After a Divorce

Filing for bankruptcy before or after divorce

 

Money and financial issues are the top cause of arguments between spouses, according to a 2018 survey that was conducted by Ramsey Solutions. Financial stress is also the second leading cause of divorce after infidelity. These statistics show that there is little wonder that many couples who plan to divorce may also be in financial situations that necessitate filing for bankruptcy.

If you want to file for divorce and also want to file for bankruptcy, the timing is important. When you are trying to figure out whether to file before your divorce, at the same time as you are divorcing, or following your divorce, there are several things that the experienced attorneys at the Cantor Law Group thing that you should consider.


Filing for Bankruptcy Before Your Divorce: Pros and Cons

There are several ways that filing for bankruptcy before your divorce can benefit you. If you file for bankruptcy first, you and your spouse will only have to pay one filing fee and can share the legal fees of your bankruptcy attorney. Filing for bankruptcy first can also make the property division portion of your divorce case simpler. In a normal divorce, the court will divide both the assets and the debts. If you and your spouse secure a discharge of your unsecured debts, neither one of you will have to pay them after you receive the discharge. This means that the court will not need to divide them.

It is also important to note that if a judge orders your spouse to pay a debt that you share, the court’s order will not impact the creditor. Since the creditor is not a party to your divorce, it can go after either you or your spouse to collect payment. If you do not obtain a discharge of a debt through bankruptcy, the creditor can seek to collect what is owed regardless of the family court’s orders. If it is discharged in a bankruptcy that you and your spouse file before you file for divorce, the creditor may not engage in any further collection activities for that debt against either you or your spouse.

Filing for bankruptcy before your divorce also has a few disadvantages. If you plan to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy instead of for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, it may be a better idea for you to wait to file your bankruptcy case until after your divorce is finalized. This is because of the differences between these two types of bankruptcy.

Read More about Bankruptcy During and After Divorce…

Who Gets the Pets After a Divorce?

Who gets Pet After a Divorce in Arizona

Most people would agree that they view their pets as members of their families. They may treat their dogs as if they are children in a divorce. People purchase toys for their dogs, send them to obedience school, and use a similar sing-songy tone of voice when they speak to the dogs that they use with small children. When people divorce, it is little wonder that they may have bitter disputes over who will get their cats or dogs. Battles over pets in divorce cases can become ugly, and some couples will spend thousands of dollars in fees to try to win custody of their pets. While people might view their pets as their children, the law treats them differently. Here is what you should know about how pets are treated in divorce cases.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, almost 57% of U.S. households own pets. Approximately 38% of people who own pets own at least one dog, and 25% own cats. According to a survey by the American Association of Matrimonial Lawyers, pet custody disputes are increasing. In that survey, the AAML found that cases in which pet custody disputes were allowed had increased by 22% over the preceding five years. Of the disputes, 88% involved disputes over dogs while 5% involved disputes over cats. Overall, 27% of the lawyers said that they had noticed an increase in the number of clients who had disputes over their pets.


How are Pets Viewed by Arizona Courts?

Under A.R.S. § 25-211, all of the property that a couple accumulates during a marriage is considered to be the community property of both spouses. Historically, pets have been viewed as a type of personal property and have simply been awarded to one spouse or another just like other types of property such as cars, furniture, art collections, and etc. Some courts will not allow people to argue about pet custody since the judges view the pets as just another type of property. In cases in which the pets were acquired for very little money, the judges may be unwilling to entertain arguments about who will get them.

This is changing, however. More courts are allowing arguments about the custody of pets in recognition of the importance that they have in people’s lives. In three states, including California, Illinois, and Alaska, there are now laws in place that provide factors for courts to consider in contested pet disputes in divorces. Arizona does not have such a law, however, which means that not all judges will agree to hear arguments about the custody of pets. California’s law outlines a number of factors that judges can consider when determining who will get the pets, including the following:

  • Which person feeds the pet?
  • Which person paid for or adopted the pet?
  • Which person pays for the pet’s food and toys?
  • Which person walks the pet?
  • Which person takes the pet to see the veterinarian?
  • Which person spends more time with the pet?
  • Whether there have been allegations of animal abuse against either spouse?

Read More about Pets During a Divorce…

Legal Separation vs Divorce in Arizona

Legal Separation vs Divorce in Arizona

What is the Difference Between Legal Separation and Divorce?

While a legal separation is uncommon, it is still used by some couples in lieu of divorces. There are several reasons why people choose legal separation instead of a divorce. In some cases, it may make more sense for a couple to become legally separated while in others, it may be better to file for divorce. Before deciding which you want to choose, it is important that you understand the differences between legal separation and divorce and the potential benefits and drawbacks of each.

Legal separation has some similarities to divorce but has some key differences. When a couple gets divorced, it terminates their marriage. Their property, assets, and debts are divided between them, and the court issues orders regarding child custody, child support, and possibly, spousal maintenance. When a couple chooses legal separation instead of divorce, it is a formal process through which a couple separates without getting divorced. The court will issue orders about the division of the property and debts, child custody and support, and possibly, spousal maintenance. However, the couple will still be married.

People who are legally separated still must answer that they are married on their tax forms and on other forms. They also are not free to marry other people since they are married. While many couples who get legal separations will eventually divorce, some choose to remain legally separated instead of getting divorced for a variety of reasons. If a legally separated couple does choose to eventually divorce, the orders from their legal separation will be incorporated into their divorce decree.

Read More about Legal Separation vs Divorce…

Request a Free Consultation

Fill out the form below to receive a free and confidential initial consultation.

Click here for important legal disclaimer.

CURRENT/PAST ASSOCIATIONS & AWARDS


10.0 Superb Rating AVVO

10.0 Superb Rating
AVVO

AV-Highest Rated Preeminent Lawyers Martindale-Hubbell

AV-Rated Preeminent Lawyers
Martindale-Hubbell

Southwest Super Lawyer Family Law

Super Lawyers
Top Family Lawyers

Top 10 Attorney National Academy of Fammily Law Attorneys

Top 10 Attorney
National Academy of
Family Law Attorneys

Top 100 Trial Lawyers American Trial Lawyers Association

Top 100 Trial Lawyers
American Trial Lawyers Association

Sustaining Member Arizona Trial Lawyers Association

Sustaining Member
Arizona Trial Lawyers Association

Top 100 Lawyer American Society of Legal Advocates

Top 100 Lawyer
American Society of Legal Advocates

Charter Member Trial Masters

Charter Member
Trial Masters

Nation's Top 1% Attorney National Association of Distinguished Counsel

Nation's Top 1% Attorney
National Association of Distinguished Counsel

Lifetime Charter Member Best Attorneys of America

Lifetime Charter Member
Best Attorneys of America

Member American Bar Foundation

Member
American Bar Foundation

Member American Association for Justice

Member
American Association for Justice

Member Since 1989 American Bar Association

Member Since 1989
American Bar Association

Top Valley Lawyer North Valley Magazine

Top Valley Lawyer
North Valley Magazine

Better Business Bureau A+ Rating

Better Business Bureau
A+ Rating

Call Now Button